6 Ways to Get Kids to Stay in Bed

sleep

I remember with my older daughter Alicen, the night she realized she could get out of her toddler bed she was up something like 42 times in the first hour.  I know, it can be infuriating.  There are many options to keep them tucked in at bedtime.

The mantra – This is where you summon your most peaceful self and prepare to take them back and take them back and take them back. When you do this you either say nothing OR you say the same thing each time with same tone and emotion. In our house this was a very flat “you mut stay in bed.” You also want to strive to take them back in the same way each time. I did, hands on shoulders guided walking each time.  Even if they go boneless and sloutch to the floor, you repeat as best you can. The idea here is they are getting out for attention, for a game and you are not giving it to them, not playing back. If you choose to do this, you must know that you will stay calm. If you can stay calm and outlast, the next night it is less and then less again and then done. If you snap and lose it at time 17 and yell, “I said STAY IN BED!” You have just taught the child, 17 is the goal, that’s when it becomes a game. If you can outlast them, it should be over in a few nights.

A consequence – Using this technique, you let child know “If you stay in bed, your door can stay open. If you get out of bed, your door will be closed.” If child gets out of bed, you might close the door for one minute the first time and longer on later times.  This only works if your child likes to sleep with the door open.

The check-in – This plan reinforces the positive. This is when you say to child at the end of tuck-in, “If you are laying down and quiet I will pat your back (or come sit with you, sing to you, play with your hair etc.)”  Then you leave and just a minute or so later return and say “You are laying down and quiet, I will pat your back.” When you do, again say and do the same thing each time (or say nothing) and stay less than 30 seconds. Ever so gradually work your way up to longer stretches out of the room. A child who is laying down and quiet for long stretches will likely fall asleep. There are check-in methods like Ferber and Mindell that build this into the regular bedtime routine in a systematic way.

The babygate – We have known many families that when they tuck-in, it’s over. They put the babygate on the door and are done.  Child may get out of bed, mill around, call for mom, fall asleep by door but it’s still done. Given a night or two they tend to fall asleep in bed. If you are going to do this, room MUST be child-proof (dressers attached to walls and all).

The stay – This is the family that finishes the bedtime routine, tucks-in and then stays. The first week, you might sit on the edge of the bed with your hand on their back. The next week, sit on the edge of the bed with your hands in your lap. Have a comfy chair because the next week, you move a foot away. Gradually, week by week, you move yourself out of the room. The trick here is to do this with little to no talking. If you engage in conversation easily, this may not work for you. There are gradual move-out methods like Brazelton that describe this in detail.

Tickets – As children hit are four years old and older, tickets may be an easy answer.  The idea is to give the child two tickets (small, cut out, construction paper rectangles) with each ticket representing one request or time to get up. Child needs a re-tuck, one ticket. Child needs a drink of water, one ticket.  When the tickets are gone, child stays in bed. Not quite sure why this one works but often it does.

To learn more about ways to keep them in bed and about other bedtime routines and sleep issues, join Dr. Rene on Wednesday Sept. 24 from 7:00-9:00pm for our workshop on Bedtime Routines and Sleep Issues.  For more information and to register, please visit http://www.eventbrite.com/org/283710166?s=1328924.

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Comments

  1. We’ve had great success moving our 2 year old into a double bed, using rolled down covers and side rails as natural barriers coupled with the good night light to keep her in bed until reasonable hour in the morning. She doesn’t get out by herself even after I showed her how to get down.

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