How Choices Work in Positive Discipline

Child looking for direction

When offering choices in discipline, the goal is to offer two positive choices for the child that both meet your goal in parenting.  These choices can focus on the how, what, when or where.  Let’s say you need to have the playroom cleaned up.  Offering choices about how could include, “Would you like to start by yourself or with help?” or “Would you like to throw the balls or drop them in the basket?”  Choices about what may include, “Would you like to start with the blocks or the balls first?” or “Would you like to start with red toys or blue toys?” A choice about when would be, “Would you like to clean before bath or before bed?”  A choice about where would be “Would you like to start on this side of the room or that?”

Choices work because the child gets to have some power.  Choices elicit cooperation; the child willingly does what you want her to do because she gets to make a decision.  This is especially true for young children under five years old because they have very little power in their day.  They are often told where to go, when to go and to be quiet while they are going there.  If you ask a three-year-old who is hemming about having to take medicine, “Would you like it with a spoon or a dropper?” and he replies, “Dropper!” he is more willing to take the medicine because of his newly found sense of control.

The choices don’t have to be important ones.  For that child who is hesitant to take medicine you could offer, “Would you like it with juice or water?”  The next night ask, “Standing or sitting?”  The next night ask, “In the kitchen or in the bathroom?”  None of these choices are terribly important in the process, but they tend to gain compliance for the parenting goal of downing the medicine.

To be fair, both options must be good for the child.  Steer clear of offering one positive and one negative option.  I think of Alicen who makes a lot of noise throughout the day; she hums and whistles and sings.  By the end of the day, it can be a bit much.  When we are all in the kitchen getting ready for dinner, I might say, “You can do that in here very quietly or out in the foyer loud.”  Neither of those options is particularly bad.  If I offered one positive and one negative, I might say, “You can do that in here quietly or go to your room.” In this case, my language is manipulative.  I am saying, “Here is a bad and here is a good; now which do you want?”  Children typically understand this and think, “Well, duh!  Nobody wants the bad.”  They are forced to choose the one you want them to choose.  That is not a choice; it is a consequence and should be stated as such: “If you do not quiet down, I will send you to your room.”  When there is one positive and one negative, it is a given what will happen; it is not a choice.  Rather than provide a false choice that is actually a consequence  like “You can mow the lawn today or be grounded; which do you want?”  parents will get better results by stating the cause and effect clearly: “If you do not mow the lawn, I will ground you.”

In most discipline, choices come after any needed “I” messages or empathy but before consequences.  As you enter into discipline, it is best to address emotions first.  Help yourself and your child to calm and manage emotions before you try to discipline or to fix the situation.  Once that is done or if that is not needed, think choices before consequences.  Choices work because they elicit cooperation.  Children are often happy to do the thing you want them to do.  Negative logical consequences work because you are putting your foot down.  Children are often resentful of the process or angry that you just trumped them.  The order of response would be to lead with the choice.

First: “Do you want the red or the blue sweatshirt?”

And then, if necessary, follow that up with a logical consequence.

Second: “If don’t get dressed now, we will lose our time for the playground.”

This puts the happy option first and follows up with the less agreeable way if happiness fails.  The other order – consequence first followed by choice – is usually less effective. Children will be less willing to choose if you were just firm with them. An example would look like: “If you do not get dressed right now, we’ll lose our time for the playground.  Now which do you want the red or the blue sweatshirt?”    You already put your foot down, so it is far less attractive to take you up on a choice.  Choices should come first because they are flexible and open.  Consequences are closed; there is a built-in outcome.

There are a few exceptions to the “choices first” guideline.  Aggressive behaviors tend to go straight to consequences.  Hitting, kicking, biting and screaming in someone’s face are behaviors that do not have choices available; they just don’t.  In those cases, I tend to think consequences first after attending to and offering empathy to the “victim.”

There are a few expected stages in development when choices can be especially effective.  At various ages, many children are driven to gain independence in particular ways. Around two to three years old, most children are driven to do things for themselves. Parents of toddlers and preschoolers often hear, “I do it myself.”  It is helpful if parents can offer choices such as “Would you like to do it by yourself or with help?”

Around six years old, children tend to push for more control over their schedule and routines.  It can be helpful if parents offer choices such as “Would you like to read books or color now?” or “Let’s invite a playdate.  Would you like to call Lindsey or Emily to play?”  Around the eight years old, children may push for more physical  independence.  Choices such as, “Would you all like to sit with us or a few aisles away?” can be helpful.  In the pre-teen years, children tend to need more privacy.  Parents can offer choices such as, “Would you all like some time alone in your room or in the basement?”  If children feel thwarted in their push for independence, they may become evasive in their efforts.  If you feel struggles happening over these pushes for new independence, it is most helpful to examine the amount of control you are exerting over your children.

Children benefit from practice at making decisions. Kohn states that children “learn to make good decisions by making decisions.” Ideally, you are offering these choices throughout the day, not just in discipline. Asking questions like “Would you like peanut butter or ham and cheese?” or “Do you want to play blocks or balls?” provides children with safe opportunities to practice making choices. These opportunities are out of the moment of discipline.  There is less hanging in the balance.  The better children get at weighing the options and making decisions when the decisions are not weighted with importance, the better they’ll handle choices within discipline.  When my children came to me at seven years old and ask, “What should I do about this?”   I wanted to be able to give it back to them by asking, “What do you think you should do?”  To gain experience problem-solving –to come up with and weigh options –  children need practice.

As a general guideline, when children are under five years old, provide only two choices.  If you open the closet and ask a three-year-old, “What would you like to wear?” the choices can be overwhelming.  Children will let you know when they are ready for wider choices.  You might ask, “Do you want the red or the blue sweatshirt?”  If they reply, “How about the green,” they are likely ready for more options.  By all means, if green is another sweatshirt which meets your parenting goal, it is fine.  If the green is a party dress and if you are headed to the muddy playground, you might say, “I really like the green too, but today it is red or blue.” It is fine to reiterate choices.  If this strategy still doesn’t work, you can choose for them, but you have to let them know that is coming. You could say, “This is taking a long time.  You can choose or I will choose for you.” Most kids will choose immediately because they don’t want to lose that power. This shift should not sound like “Okay. This is taking too long; I choose the blue.”  If you swoop in and take their power without warning, you will surely be met by upset or tantrums.

While choices often work, sometimes, they just don’t. You warn children to make a choice, and they fall to pieces.  Or, they do make a choice but then throw it down and run from the room screaming.  When choices fail, you can fall back on consequences.  Moving to consequences also prevents you from being bogged down by choices.  Occasionally, we have a parent who says that choices don’t work because, for example, “My child says ‘no’ to the initial offer, so I come up with other choices and she just refuses every option,” or “We go in circles all day because he’ll pick something and then change his mind and fight for the other.”  In these scenarios, the child has led the use of choices into a power struggle. The idea is to offer one set of choices, encourage a decision, and then move forward.  If choices break down, move to consequences rather than join in the struggle by offering a series of choices.  If the choices initially work and then a bit later the child starts to lose interest, it is fine to offer a second set of choices to keep the momentum going.  It is success if you are cleaning the playroom together and initially offer, “Would you like to start with the blocks or the balls?” and the child chooses and starts picking up the blocks.  If interest fades six minutes later, you can offer another set of choices, “Do you want to finish the blocks by yourself or with help?”

Another possible challenge with choices is when a child will choose one but then push for the other. Let’s say you offer, “Would you like cereal or oatmeal?” The child chooses oatmeal, you make it and as you set it on the table the child says, “No!  I want cereal.” At that late point, if you then make the cereal, the child will push for the second option often.  There is more power in getting you to make two.  If you want that push to end, offer empathy around the first choice but stick with it through the upset.  Say “I know you like cereal.  I am sorry but I’ve already made the oatmeal and that’s what is for breakfast. You are welcome to cereal tomorrow.” It may take a few times of sticking with the first choice, but if you are consistent, the push for the second thing should lessen.  If you have a child who does this often, you can confirm before making the oatmeal. After you have offered and child chose, you can say “I heard you, you picked cereal. I am going to make it and we are going to stick with it.  Do you understand?” At least you feel better about sticking with the first choice.

Choices are flexible and work because they share power with the child.  They also teach decision-making and often result in a more peaceful exchange than consequences.

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Trackbacks

  1. […] sit on the little potty or the big potty?”  Here is a link to a previous post on choices: https://parentingbydrrene.wordpress.com/2012/10/01/how-choices-work-in-positive-discipline/.  Descriptive praise is being behavior specific when you catch good behaviors.  This sounds like, […]

  2. […] • Positive choices – Giving children choices would be saying “do you want to start with the blocks or balls?” or “Would you like to throw those in or dump truck them in the basket?” When a child makes a choices they are that much closer to doing the behavior. For more information about how choices work in discipline, please read this. […]

  3. […] breakfast or what to wear or how to spend their time on a Saturday afternoon. Here’s a full post on the use of choices in […]

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