Helping Child Learn to Make Decisions

Hi Dr. Rene,
I have a 3rd grader who at times  seems to be paralyzed by indecision.  Here is a typical situation: each week his teacher sends home a homework packet that requires two reading and writing activities.  He is given ten activities to choose two from  (e.g., write a letter to the librarian telling her why she should get this  book).  Although he reads for at least 30 minutes a night, he has  difficulty choosing what book to base an activity on and then choosing an activity.  He asks us for help and we will suggest a book he has just read  and a potential activity or two, but that never seems to help.  He will  spend a half hour to an hour fretting about what to do and sometimes ends up in  tears.  What is the best way for us to support him in this situation?   He is a good reader and grasps what he is reading, but this particular activity  is very draining for him.
Thank you for your advice,
Cindy

Hi Cindy,
I would focus first on teaching him decision making separate from homework time. Start small, each day give him choices like apples or oranges for snack or playing monopoly or clue with you. Continually offer very small choices. When you are in the car a book on tape or music, tucking in this story or that. When he is able to make small choices, occasionally comment, “You decided that by yourself,” “I saw you think about it and decide on this story,” or ask, “How did you make that decision so easily? What helped you decide?” Talk with him through his decision making process.

When a choice is too difficult, focus on helping him weigh his options. Remind him of the high and low points of each choice, remind him how or what he chose last time or how it worked out. If he really can’t decide whether you choose for him or not, I would ask him to let you know one thing he liked about each of the options and why he might haven chosen each one later. This is still teaching him to look at the details.

Gradually work your way up to bigger decisions such as who to invite over to play or which after school activity to sign-up for. Afterwards talk about how either decision would have it’s benefits. With homework specifically, maybe talk about what types of projects he’s enjoyed doing before or what types of projects tend to get the best grades. You might take a list of ten projects are first whittle it down to the top three. If they truly are equal choices to him or he wrestles with the decision among the top three for more than a few minutes, teach him how to make the arbitrary decisions like flipping a coin or assigning numbers and rolling a die, at this age even eeny-meeny-miney-mo works.

I would also try to find fun ways to practice like the Choose Your Own Adventures storybooks that were popular in the 80s and 90s. These are read aloud chapter books that every few pages children get to choose the direction of the plot. Encourage him to pick the ice cream flavor at the grocery store or the next family outing to take. Think of fun ways to practice choices often.

If it really is more narrowly related to academics and homework, it may be that he is perfectionistic or stressed about academic performance. If this seems the issue I would learn more about perfectionistic tendencies and talk to his teacher about the academic worries. Ask if he struggles this way in the classroom as well.
Sincerely, Dr. Rene

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