The “No” Phase

Dear Dr. Rene,

My daughter-who is 3 years old has displayed a strong character since her first months. Now we are in the ‘no’ phase, anything whatsoever gets the ‘no’ response even if a few minutes later she decides to do/say what I’ve asked her. How do I get her to become more cooperative, without threatening the independence of her character?

Sincerely, Jessica

Dear Jessica,

Believe it or not, this is a typical and healthy phase.  Two and young three year olds often go through a phase of saying “no” all day long.  I remember Claire saying “no” to ice cream because I picked the flavor and a minute later she reached happily for the bowl.  Often around this time they are also driven to do the opposite, you say “up” so they say “down” and often test your commitment to it being up.  The “no” and the push for the opposite are a part of her developing a sense of self.  She is realizing self is separate from others, that she can form and share her own opinion and that there is a bit of power in testing limits.  This is also a good thing, I want children to find their voice and learn to speak their opinion.

Only ask yes/no questions if “no” is an acceptable response.  Avoid saying “are you ready for dinner?” when you really mean, “it is dinnertime, come to the table now please.”  If you ask a yes/no question, be ready to live with either answer.  If “no” is unacceptable, rephrase your question.

If “no” is an acceptable answer, let her know this.  If you ask, “would you like to sit here?” and she says “no.” I would say “okay, where would you like to sit.”  If “no” is unacceptable, you might rephrase this as a choice “would you like to sit here or here for lunch” or you might offer a contribution “I need someone to put a napkin on each plate,” as you hand them or offer a challenge, “let’s race to the table,” or just a distraction, “I am an elephant stomping to the table, are you a big elephant too?”  Sounds silly, I know but remember you are talking to a three year old.

Let’s take a harder one, say you are making a request but not asking.  You say “it’s time to clean up now, come help me,” and you get a “no.”  I would start by hearing her, “I know you don’t want to right now, it’s time to clean.” or “You really are having fun playing, it’s hard to put it away and it’s time.”  Then you might offer a choice or a challenge or a contribution.

There is also great benefit in not repeating yourself when you ask her to do something.  Here is a link to our blog post on not repeating yourself: https://parentingbydrrene.wordpress.com/2012/03/01/want-kids-to-listen-stop-repeating-yourself/

Here is a link to our blog post on choices: https://parentingbydrrene.wordpress.com/2012/10/01/how-choices-work-in-positive-discipline/

And a link to our blog post on contribution: https://parentingbydrrene.wordpress.com/2012/10/12/contribution-getting-kids-to-help/

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