Ideas for Reading Aloud with Older Children

Leisure time for mother and daughter

The Department of Education encourages parents to read aloud to their children 20 minutes a day at a minimum.  The idea is to read aloud to them for longer stretches and more often as you are able.  It’s also suggested that you continue to read aloud to your children long passed the time you thought they’d listen.  Children read to aloud through high school do better on Verbal SATs than those read to aloud through middle school and through middle school better than through grade school.

I know most parents reduce their reading aloud time as children become more fluent, independent readers.  The trick is to give time for both.  When my older daughter wanted time to read to herself, we added that to the bedtime routine rather than replacing our read aloud time.  So they got 20 minutes of read aloud and an additional 20 minutes of reading books independently.

There are lots of good ideas to help read alouds continue.

  • Keep it part of the daily routine – This way you don’t have to find the time each day, it’s already there.  It also makes it expected.  If you stop reading aloud for a long stretch of time, children may be more hesitant or think “it’s for babies” when you try to start again.
  • Let your children pick the books – At any age, it is helpful if children feel they have some choice in the matter.  Letting them pick the books is an easy way to give this.  When the girls were little I’d read the same books 20 nights in a row if that’s what they picked.  Now we take turns choosing chapter books.  I almost always pick a classic because they never do.
  • Take turns reading aloud – Once they are fluent readers, it can be nice to take turns during this read aloud time.
  • Occasionally read more active participation books – This might be a fill in the blank book or a quiz book.  This might be something along the lines of the Choose Your Own Adventure series that let the reader make plot  decisions throughout the book.
  • Shake up the types of books – As they are older, some children are drawn to biographies or sports books, others to how-to books or articles from magazines.  You might also try poetry or plays.  Any reading is fine.
  • Read picture books longer – Once you start chapter books, it’s good to include picture books occasionally.  There are so many picture books that really are aimed at older kids.  You might try Stripes or Mr. Peabody’s Apples.
  • Occasionally, read their homework aloud – Not often as they need to be doing this reading but I think it’s fine once in a while to read their homework aloud.  I’ve done this, especially when they are struggling with a topic or the reading seems particularly dry to them.

Any other ideas? Please share them here!

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