rivalry

A Few Hints to Avoid Sibling Rivalry

Two little boys and father planting seedlings in vegetable garde

While these may seem like small points, using comparisons and labels and praise between siblings can cause bad feelings.

Comparisons can be direct like, “why can’t you be more like your sister?” or indirect, “look how neatly your brother keeps his room!” or, “your sister was on time, but we are always waiting on you.” Any negative comparison makes the child feel badly, and overtime it builds resentment towards the other sibling. If you need to encourage a behavior, the better approach is to state it directly such as, “go clean your room,” or, “I need you to be on time.”

Labels assign children roles. This can be as simple as, “this is our big boy, and this is our baby.” Big boy implies responsibility, baby implies none. The baby label can be problematic on it’s own if used long past the point of the child being a baby. A seven-year-old with the baby label may expect to do less in the way of chores or academics because the thinking is, ‘I’m a baby.’

Labels can also be bigger such as, “this is our student, and this is our athlete.”  What you just said to the first is, “you’re not so coordinated,” and to the second, “you’re not so smart.” It’s better to avoid the labels and open wider opportunities to each. Get your student signed up for something athletic, and get your athlete a tutor.

Praise should be given individually. This means avoid giving one child praise to curb their sibling’s behavior. You want to avoid saying, “wow Johny, look how neatly you keep your room,” and then glaring at his sister. It is fine to praise Johny for his clean room, but your intent should be clean. You should be praising him for what you noticed, NOT to curb his sister. If you need the sister to clean her room, just say it directly to her. When you give praise in a relative way, it is negative for both. Obviously it’s not good to be the one that got knocked, but it’s still not good to be the one that got praised in spite of sibling. There is a need to stay on top, to keep others down which is a seed of sibling rivalry.

To learn more about sibling relationships, managing competition between siblings and the effects of birth order, attend my Birth Order and Sibling Rivalry workshop in the evening on May 22.  For more information and to register, please visit http://www.eventbrite.com/o/parenting-by-dr-rene-parenting-playgroups-283710166?s=1328924.

Allow Negative Emotions Between Siblings

Zwei Kinder streiten sich

Following an upset in her bedroom, an older daughter storms into the kitchen saying, “I hate her! She is always ruining my stuff!” Unfortunately, common parent responses include giving logic or reason, “she is younger than you, you have to be patient,” or a demand, “she is your sister, she is going to be your best friend in life,” or, “we are a family of love.” Worse yet, parents might deny the emotion overall, “you don’t hate her, you love her.” All of these responses teach the older child to bottle emotions, teach that her emotions are wrong and give her something to argue about. These responses let her know that you don’t understand.

it’s better in these moments to understand her emotion, give empathy and validate her emotion. This would sound like, “wow, you are mad at her! You don’t want her in your room.” The parent is labeling the emotion and letting the child know she is understood, that her emotions are her own and they are important. The child feels connected and can safely express herself. She can move forward from the emotion, rather than have to hang on to it and argue.

I am not saying you have to allow the word “hate” or let them scream negative things at each other day in and day out. You can follow-up by curbing the words as you would behavior. After you’ve given empathy, and the situation has calmed, it’s fair game to loop back by saying, “I know you are mad. When you are mad, I need you to find a better way to say it.” Then talk with your child about better ways. You might curb the language moving forward with, “those words are too hurtful. If I hear that again you will be in separate rooms.” Also, it’s good to spend time with both children addressing the specific behaviors at hand. This may be coming up with house rules about being in each other’s rooms, or setting aside time when they play separately each day to give them a bit more elbow room.

If you want to learn more about sibling relationships, there is a great book titled Siblings Without Rivalry by Faber and Mazlish.

Whining Between Siblings

Dear Dr. Rene,
I have three sons: ages seven years, five years and two months. We hear a fair amount of whining from the seven-year-old. We respond the way you suggest, “I can’t understand that voice. I’ll be ready to hear your regular voice in a few minutes. Please wait.” The tricky part is that the seven-year-old will still whine to get what he wants from the five-year-old, and the five-year-old usually gives in. How do we stop whining between siblings and peers?
Thanks,
Jodie
Mom of three

Dear Jodie,
Some of this is inevitable. Children bicker and whine and argue with their siblings out of range of you and there is little that can be done.

When you are present, you might take a more active role in coaching them to curb each other. This would mean stepping in and moderating the conversation, “johnney, did you hear the way your brother asked? It would be nice for all our family members to hear things in a pleasant way.” Then turn to whiner and say, “Johnney doesn’t like being spoken to that way. Can you find a nicer way to say that?” If everytime you can intervene and have them fix their voice and practice the better way, the whining should lessen. You might remind them over breakfast that the goal for the day is pleasant voices for all. You might have a nickel jar and anyone who whines at any time has to add a nickel. You might make it a competition, when anyone whines challenge who can come up with the highest number of nice ways to ask and let them practice.

I hope this helps.
Sincerely,
Dr. Rene
http://www.parentingplaygroups.com

%d bloggers like this: