Helping a Child Be Resilient

Hi Dr. Rene,

My 2.5 year old is going through a lot of the typical 2 year old stuff.  He has a growing imagination, talks lots, tests boundaries and experiencing new fears.  I am taking this all in stride but I do find myself thinking that he doesn’t seem very resilient.  He seems so sensitive to small pains, slights and annoyances.  He is also pretty tuned in to loud noises, new tastes and textures.  I don’t expect him to manage on his own or become resilient overnight but I’d love tips on how to help him better weather the little upsets.

Sincerely,

Diane

Dear Diane,

Thanks for the question.  It’s a big one.  There are many ways to help build resiliency across childhood.  I apologize for this list, most of the bullet points represent what should be a whole book of content.  For now give lots of empathy and teach problem solving at every turn.  When you can, focus on problem solving in the moment.  If he is too upset, remember to go back later and discuss or brainstorm what could have happened for a better outcome.

  • Model and Encourage Optomism – If you are an optomistic person, this is an easy one.  Unfortunately, if you are a pessimist, this can be near impossible.  The idea is to model looking on the bright side, focusing on solutions and having faith things can be resolved.
  • Use Descriptive and Avoid Evaluative Praise – Evaluative praise to avoid sounds like, “good job,” “you are such a good boy,” “that was great,” “thank you so much,” “I really like that,” “I like the way you…” and “I am so proud of you.”  Descriptive praise to use sounds like, “You handed a block, that was helpful,” and “you waited while mommy was speaking, that was patient.”  This means to describe the behavior and then give it a related label.
  • Focus Your Discipline on the Behavior NOT the Child – This means using “I messages” and avoiding “you messages” as you enter into a discipline exchange.  When a child runs through the living room and knocks over your lamp it’s saying “I’m angry, my lamp is broken,” or “I’m frustrated, people are running in the house.”  It’s avoiding “I am mad at you, you broke my lamp,” or “I’m frustrated, you always run in the house.”  I messages label emotions and blame the behavior or the situation not the child.
  • Learn Scaffolding – Scaffolding is the language of problem solving.  When you help a four year old with a new puzzle or a fourth grader working on hard math, your language and approach is your scaffolding.  There is a review of effective scaffolding guidelines in this previous post https://parentingbydrrene.wordpress.com/?s=scaffolding.
  • Avoid Rescuing – This is a difficult one to practice when your child is a toddler but important to keep in mind as they grow.  If they steal a trinket from a store have them return it rather than doing it for them.  If they purposefully break a toy, avoid replacing it.
  • Teach Decision Making and Offer Choices – Allowing greater decision making is a gradual process.  At two years old they might decide what snack to have, at four years old what toy to buy, at six years old waht clothes to wear, at eight years old what sports to play, at ten years old what instrument to learn.  Of course, you are providing guidance as needed but focus on teaching them how to make decisions rather than making decisions for them.
  • Positive Attitude Towards Learning and School – The idea is to build a “home-school connection” so the child grows up feeling my parents value my school and my school welcomes my parents.  Read to them everyday, know what they are learning about in school, participate as a room mom and in extracurricular activities.  Check their homework, teach them to study and meet their teachers.
  • Check and Build Social Skills – A child’s sense of social connectedness and acceptance from others is a big part of their developing self esteem which overlaps strongly with resiliency.  In childhood, social competence is defined loosely as the ability to play while keeping friends.  If play isn’t going well on a regular basis for your child, step back and check their social skills.  Work together to improve as needed.  This includes their conflict resolution skills.  Friends also provide a social network to cushion the blows of life.
  • Focus On and Develop Talents – A second foundation of self esteem is a child’s growing sense of skills and abilities.  Look for their strengths, provide opportunities to build their talents.
  • Provide Downtime – AAPs suggests children have a minimum of an hour of downtime everyday.  Downtime is truely unstructured, go play time.  This can be with other children if it’s by choice and child led.
  • Sense of Faith or Spirituality – Not one better than another but children raised with a sense of faith or spirituality tend to be more resilient in the face of life stressors.

As a side note, your descriptions, “He seems so sensitive to small pains, slights and annoyances.  He is also pretty tuned in to loud noises, new tastes and textures,” lend themselves to possible sensory concerns.  This could easily be well within normal limits and not an issue.  If this continues to be the pattern or seems worse overtime, you might read The Out of Sync Child by Kranowitz or take a consultation with a pediatric occupational therapist.  Either will also give you additional ideas about resiliency more related to sensory processing.  Please let me know if you have additional questions about this.

Please enjoy this link to an article about building resiliency written by the American Academy of Pediatrics on www.healthychildren.org.  –  http://www.healthychildren.org/english/healthy-living/emotional-wellness/pages/Building-Resilience-in-Children.aspx?nfstatus=401&nftoken=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000&nfstatusdescription=ERROR%3a+No+local+token

Sincerely, Dr. Rene

Advertisements

Comments

  1. I do bring up my son old school. He has chore base punishements, encourage reading and thinking. These are skills you need to get you through life later.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: