Helping Kids Speak Up for Themselves

This post is for parents whose children lack an assertive voice.  When Alicen was a toddler, if someone took a toy or did something she didn’t like, she would just stand there or just stand there and cry.  When she was a preschooler, she would sadly walk away or come bury her face against my leg.  She didn’t have an assertive voice.  She didn’t readily stand up for herself.

There is a series of steps to teaching children an assertive voice.  Again, this is not a quick fix.  We started this process with Alicen six years ago, and we continue to work on it in small ways.  Clearly, she has made great progress, but we are still addressing the issues.  If you have a child who lacks assertive voice, you’ll have to make a decision about which steps are necessary depending on age and comfort level.

The first thing I ask any child, whether they are at the first step or the last, whether they are two or seven years old, is, “Did you like that?”  It gets kids turned around.  They stop thinking “Oh, poor me.  I am so sad,” and they start thinking, “No.  I didn’t like that.”  They start to think about standing up for themselves.

For the remainder of this example, let’s assume another child took a toy your child was playing with.  After you ask, “Did you like that?” the entry step is to then go with the child and do the talking for them.  Take her hand, walk with her to the other child and say calmly, “She wasn’t done with that.  She’d like to finish her turn.”  You are modeling the language that you hope the child will some day take as his own.  Eventually, you want him to say, “I wasn’t done with that.  I’d like to finish my turn.”

Once they are comfortable with that, you can move to the next step.  After asking whether they liked that, go with them and provide an example of what to say on the way as you go with her.  You might take your child’s hand and say, “When we get there, say, ‘I’m not done,’ or ‘I want that back.’”  Hopefully, you arrive at the other child and your child will try out the language you suggested.  This step may take several attempts.  It took many exchanges before Alicen actually spoke up for herself.  For quite a while, I would give examples, we would arrive at the other child and Alicen would just look up at me blankly.  If this happens, continue to model the language.

Once she is comfortable speaking up when you go and provide examples, think about stepping out a bit more.  First, you can give examples, and then, stay back while she goes over alone.  After you ask if she liked that, you can say, “Ok, I’m going to stay here; when you go over, you can say, ‘I want to finish my turn.’”  Or, you can go with her and prompt her to come up with the language on her own.  You can say, “I’ll go with you.  What are you going to say to him?”

Whichever path you take, the next step is to have her come up with the language and go over on her own.  This is the last step, and this is where Alicen continues to be today.  She’ll run up to me at the playground and say, “She took that from me!”  I’ll ask, “Did you like that?”  She’ll reply, “No, I didn’t!”  I’ll ask, “What are you going to say?”  She’ll reply, “I’m going to tell her that I want to finish my turn.”  I’ll say, “Okay, go try that,” and off she’ll go.  I’m not really doing much.  She is just rebounding off me.  I am there providing support.  I assume that when she is away from me, she is handling much of this on her own.

What if your child uses her assertive voice and it doesn’t work?  You coach her, and she bravely walks over and says, “I wasn’t done with that.  I’d like it back please.”  The other child rolls his eyes and says, “So what?  I’m playing with it now.”  As a parent you have choices.  I think any of them are fine, just think about it ahead of time.  Be prepared.  You might mention it to his parents and hope for support.  You might go over and reiterate for your child.  Another child might be more willing to listen to you than to your child.  You might let your child know that she did the right thing.  She used the right language, but sometimes things don’t work out as we plan.  This is true in life.  As adults, we might ask another in a restaurant, “Could you light that in a few minutes? We’re about to leave.”  The other patron rolls his eyes and says, “So what?  I’m smoking it now.”  Sometimes things don’t work out as we plan.

Then, I think of Claire and other children who fall at the opposite end of the spectrum.  Even as a toddler, she told people what she thought, when she thought it.  I have seen other children who speak out a bit too loudly when they are assertive.  As long as no one is getting hurt, I want children to keep their assertive voices.  Rather than disciplining a child for being too loud at this, parents should coach and model other ways for children to better express themselves.

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Comments

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Trackbacks

  1. […] Another important piece is teaching children to have an assertive voice in social exchange.  This is not teaching them to be aggressive but rather to feel comfortable standing up for themselves.  Here is a link to a previous blog post on teaching assertive voice:  https://parentingbydrrene.com/2012/10/15/helping-kids-speak-up-for-themselves/. […]

  2. […] own. You might follow this up with reinforcing their new words to the other. It can be helpful to teach your child to use an assertive voice in […]

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